US consumer prices flat in November as energy plunges

first_imgWASHINGTON — U.S. consumer prices were unchanged in November, the best performance since prices actually fell eight months ago. The docile inflation reading reflected a big drop in the cost of gasoline and other energy products.The Labor Department said Wednesday that the unchanged inflation reading last month followed a 0.3 per cent jump in prices in October. It was the lowest reading since consumer prices actually fell 0.1 per cent in March. Core inflation, which excludes volatile energy and food prices, rose 0.2 per cent in November.Over the past 12 months, consumer prices have risen 2.2 per cent and core prices are also up 2.2 per cent. That performance is close to the Federal Reserve’s 2 per cent target for annual price gains and indicates that inflation remains well-behaved.Martin Crutsinger, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Power outage affecting customers south of the Alaska Highway

first_imgThe outage is affecting 178 customers in an area east of Old Fort Rd., west of Alaska Rd., north of 85th Ave., and south of 97th Ave.As of 8:33 a.m., BC Hydro says that crews have been assigned to deal with the outage, and the cause is currently under investigation.At this point, there’s no word on when the outage will be restored.This is a developing story, and we’ll have an update once we receive more information. UPDATE: BC Hydro says that power has been restored.FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – A power outage has left nearly 200 customers south of the Alaska in Fort St. John in the dark this morning.According to BC Hydro’s website, the outage occurred at around 8:20 a.m.last_img read more

Anil Ambani Mahajan Matondkar Rekha cast vote in Mumbai

first_imgMumbai: BJP MP Poonam Mahajan, Congress nominee Urmila Matondkar, industrialist Anil Ambani and actor Rekha were among the early voters in Mumbai Monday during the fourth and final phase of Lok Sabha polls in Maharashtra. State education minister Vinod Tawde, BJP candidate from Mumhai-North East Manoj Kotak and Congress nominee from Mumbai-Central Eknath Gaikwad also exercised their franchise in the initial hours. Polling is underway since 7 am across the state’s 17 Lok Sabha seats where 3.11 crore voters are eligible to exercise their democratic right. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss account details under automatic exchange framework Polling is being held in Nandurbar, Dhule, Dindori, Nashik (North Maharashtra), Palghar, Bhiwandi, Kalyan, Thane, Mumbai-North, Mumbai-North West, Mumbai-North Central, Mumbai-North East, Mumbai-South and Mumbai-South Central in the Mumbai region, Maval and Shirur in Pune district, and Shirdi in Ahmednagar district. Union minister Subhash Bhamre (contesting from Dhule), and Congress leaders Milind Deora (Mumbai-South) and Matondkar (Mumbai-North) are among the key candidates in the state. Also Read – Trio win Nobel Medicine Prize for work on cells, oxygen Deora is pitted against sitting Shiv Sena MP Arvind Sawant while Matondkar is taking on BJP MM Gopal Shetty. The prominent candidates also include Congress’ Priya Dutt from Mumbai-North Central and NCP chief Sharad Pawar’s grandnephew Parth Pawar from Maval seat. In Mumbai-North East seat, where sitting BJP MP Kirit Somaiya has been denied a ticket, the main contest is between the party nominee Manoj Kotak and NCP’s Sanjay Dina Patil. Saffron allies BJP and Shiv Sena are contesting three seats each out of total six in Mumbai. The Congress nominees are in the fray in five of these seats while the NCP has fielded its candidate in one seat. Maharashtra sends 48 MPs to Lok Sabha, the second highest after Uttar Pradesh which has 80 parliamentary seats. Polling for the previous three phases in Maharashtra was held on April 11 (seven seats), April 18 (10 seats) and April 23 (14 seats).last_img read more

Syria UN human rights office voices concerns about situation

25 March 2011The United Nations human rights office today spoke out over the worsening situation in Syria, saying it will be closely monitoring the pledge of the country’s Government to introduce political and economic reforms. Rupert Colville, a spokesperson for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), told reporters in Geneva that the office was concerned by the use of live ammunition and tear gas by authorities against peaceful protesters in Syria.At least 37 people were killed in the southern town of Deraa, including two children, and media reports today indicate that more protesters have been shot dead by security forces.“We welcome the decision to investigate the killings and reiterate our call for this investigation to be independent and impartial; those responsible for the killings must be held accountable,” Mr. Colville said.“We also welcome the release of those associated with the protests in Deraa, and hope that all human rights defenders and political activists throughout Syria, who have also reportedly been arrested, will also be released without delay.”The demonstrations in Syria are part of a broader protest movement that has swept the Middle East and North Africa since the start of the year, toppling long-standing regimes in Tunisia and Egypt and leading to fierce fighting in Libya.Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon spoke by telephone earlier today with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, stressing to the President that the people had expressed their democratic aspirations through peaceful means.Mr. Ban underlined that governments have an obligation to respect and protect the fundamental rights of citizens, and urged authorities to exercise maximum restraint.The Syrian Government announced yesterday that it would introduce a series of political and economic reforms, including holding consultations aimed at ending the state of emergency that has been in existence within the country since 1963.Mr. Colville welcomed the news and said OHCHR “will be closely monitoring the speedy and effective implementation of such reforms.” read more

Five injured as Srilankan flight faces bad weather

The flight departed Paris’s Charles de Gaulle Airport yesterday and landed safely at the Bandaranaike International Airport today despite the turbulent weather conditions experienced during the latter part of the flight. (Colombo Gazette) “Five cabin crew members have sustained minor injuries due to the incident , while no injuries have been reported among passengers. The injured were referred to medical examinations upon arrival,” the statement said. Five crew members were injured when a Sri Lankan Airlines flight flying from Paris to Colombo experienced turbulent weather conditions over the Arabian sea, close to India, a statement from the airline said.The Colombo bound flight from Paris UL 564 had 193 passengers on board including four infants and 16 crew members at the time of the incident. read more

In yet another alert UN warns of food crisis in Niger

“In Niger, several years of economic hardship or decline have also lowered people’s capacity to deal with such shocks,” the chief of FAO’s Global Information and Early Warning System, Henri Josserand, said of the impoverished West African country, which has suffered the double blow of a poor rainy season and devastation to its crops and grazing land from the worst locust invasion in 15 years.”This is why the crisis is now more acute in Niger than in other parts of the Sahel. People in affected areas are in critical need of seeds and enough food to carry them through until late October,” he added, appealing for an urgent international response.Last week, the UN World Food Programme (WFP) almost tripled the number of people it plans to feed through its emergency operation to 1.2 million.Today, FAO said severe child malnutrition is increasing rapidly and the number of children supported by feeding centres is rising.Out of 63 districts surveyed, 11 have some populations in an ‘extremely critical’ situation, and in 16 districts the situation is considered as ‘critical,’ according to national estimates. Pastoralists, in particular, have difficulty accessing main food staples.While there has been adequate rainfall in recent weeks and land preparation and planting are underway, availability of seeds in regions hard hit by drought and locusts remains limited. Desert locusts remain a serious threat, although FAO is not expecting a large-scale invasion this year. read more

No alternative to political settlement of the Burundian crisis Ban tells Security

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who visited Burundi last month as part of an international effort to end the crisis, urged the country’s leaders “to summon the necessary courage and confidence” to launch a credible political process.“There is no alternative to a political settlement of the Burundian crisis,” he toldthe Council, whose members had also visited the country in January of this year.Underscoring the importance of regional and international support for the peace efforts, Mr. Ban said that the East African Community (EAC), the African Union (AU) and the UN must work together to provide the “dedicated and professional mediation support” needed.Mr. Ban noted appointment of former President of Tanzania Benjamin Mkapa as EAC Facilitator, which he called an “encouraging development.” His own Special Advisor, Jamal Benomar, has been representing the UN in discussions, and has deployed a team to Burundi.During his visit, Mr. Ban said that he underlined his deep concern over the volatile situation in the country. “I expressed my profound worry that the potential spiralling of violence risks relapse into civil war. I urged the Government to take measures to address the continued violence and the impunity that fuels it,” he added.While there, the UN chief had discussed with President Pierre Nkuruziza the release up to 2,000 detainees, and that the President had previously announced the annulment of arrest warrants against 15 opposition figures and to re-open two media outlets.“We now look forward to the full implementation of these measures and expect further steps in the same direction,” Mr. Ban said, including the release of all political prisoners and an end to restrictions on civil society and media organizations.While in Burundi, Mr. Ban said he had also urged the Government to address the continued violence and impunity that fuels the volatile situation in the country. The top UN official said despite assurances from the Government that the security situation is stabilizing, civil society and opposition parties told him “deeply disturbing” continuing allegations of violence, including those targeting women and children.“I cannot stress enough the profound humanitarian consequences that political unrest, violence and impunity carry for the population,” Mr. Ban said. ‘Many of Burundi’s people live in terror’Also addressing the Council, High Commissioner Zeid drew international attention to the hundreds of people killed, thousands detained, and over a quarter of a million of Burundians who had fled the country.“Continued human rights violations, and impunity for perpetrators, mean that many of Burundi’s people live in terror,” he told the Council. “The country remains on the brink of a sudden escalation of violence to even more massive proportions.”He drew attention to the increasing number of arbitrary arrests and detention since January. On a recent visit of staff from the Office of the High Commissioner (OHCHR) to some detention centres in Bujumbura, “it appeared that almost half the detainees had been tortured or ill-treated, some seriously,” Mr. Zeid said. The top human rights figure also called attention to the lack of progress in investigating multiple serious human rights violations reported over the past year.“I urge further and much more credible investigations into the multiple alleged mass graves in the country, as well as into the torture, sexual violence and killings that were reported in December and many other serious allegations,” Mr. Zeid said.He took note of a recently released report into alleged extrajudicial killings during the events of 11 December 2015.In order to look into the human rights situation in the country, the secretariat of the independent expert team is due to arrive in April for a four-month deployment. The Government has yet to approve the visit, Mr. Zeid said, calling for the visit to be finalized. The UN expert team is comprised of three independent experts, per a Human Rights Council resolution from December 2015, mandated with undertaking “an investigation into violations and abuses of human rights with a view to preventing further deterioration of the human right situation.”Burundi was thrown into crisis this past April when President Nkurunziza decided to run for a controversial third term that he went on to win in July. read more

Brock students choose 2014 BUSU executive team

Brock University students have chosen their 2014 executive.Roland Erman will take over from Cooper Millard as president.Erman, who didn’t have an opponent, received 3,313 votes (90.3 per cent), easily eclipsing the 50 per cent of ‘yes’ votes he needed.Kyle Rose defeated Harish Aggarwal and Michael Nash for vice-president, finance and administration. Rose captured 2083 votes (54.4 per cent), while Aggarwal had 1,479 (38.6 per cent) and Nash finished with 270 (7 per cent).Drew Ursacki is the new vice-president, external affairs after getting 1,782 votes (48 per cent). He beat Kevin Wilson (1,482) and Erik Deacons (450).In the race for vice-president, student services, Paul Dermody had 1,743 votes (44.1 per cent) to defeat Lashkar Dehal (1,140) and Ernie Mehra (1,070).Christopher Yendt (87.4 per cent), Antonio Sergi (76 per cent) and Yi Gao (69.4 per cent) will comprise the new board of directors.The referendum motion was also voted down, meaning students won’t be required to pay a $32.00 flat fee, to be charged to all undergraduate students, to support the Brock University Students’ Union Programing Levy.Of 3,528 votes, 72 per cent were against the proposal.In total, 4,199 students (23.4 per cent) voted over three days. The 2014 executive will take office May 1.2014 BUSU executive teamPresident, Roland ErmanVice-president, finance & administration: Kyle RoseVice-president, external affairs: Drew UrsackiVice-president, student services: Paul DermodyBoard of directorsChristopher YendtAntonio SergiYi Gao read more

Winless streak extends to 7 matches for mens soccer

Junior midfielder Yianni Sarris (6) attempts to tackle the opposing player during a match against IPFW Aug. 20 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU won, 2-0.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorThe struggles for the Ohio State men’s soccer team (2-6-3, 0-2) have continued against rival Michigan, as the Buckeyes fell to the Wolverines 1-0. It was the fourth consecutive match in which OSU has failed to net a goal.Nearly 1,000 fans were in attendance for the game Sunday, and members of the Ohio State Marching Band were present for the rivalry matchup. Buckeye senior defender and captain Sage Gardner said the support of the fans and the band was great for the team.“It’s always awesome here at (Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium) and having that big of a crowd — especially against Michigan — just pumps us up,” he said. “It’s tough we couldn’t get the result today, though.”Gardner said it will be important to keep the spirits of the younger guys high as the team still has the majority of its in-conference games yet to play in addition to the Big Ten Tournament scheduled to be held at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium in November.“I don’t remember how many games we have left, but the majority of them are Big Ten and the season is still not over,” Gardner said. “We can turn things around easily by giving (the younger guys) motivation with a Big Ten Championship ring and with the Big Ten Tournament being here.”A 25th minute goal for Michigan (4-3-3, 1-1) was all it took for the Wolverines to leave Columbus with a victory.Sophomore forward James Murphy scored his third goal of the season for the Wolverines from the middle of the box, giving Michigan a 1-0 lead. Murphy’s shot went into the upper left corner of the net after he receiving a pass from Michigan junior midfielder Marcos Ugarte.OSU took 11 of its 15 shots in the second half but was unable to capitalize. The lack of scoring has become an unfortunate, yet familiar trend with this Buckeye team, OSU coach John Bluem said.“We have to elevate our intensity throughout the game,” Bluem said after the loss. “I think we may have to start looking at some different combinations and getting some other players a chance to play because we can’t seem to get it done with the players we are putting out there.”With just more than five minutes left in the match, the Buckeyes fired multiple shots, including two by junior midfielders Alec Lowell and Yianni Sarris. Lowell’s shot was high and sailed over the goal and the shot by Sarris was blocked by Wolverine redshirt-junior goalkeeper Adam Grinwis.OSU freshman forward Danny Jensen gave the Buckeyes one final chance to send the game into overtime when his header sailed toward the goal with just more than a minute left in play, but it was saved by Grinwis.Buckeye redshirt-junior goalkeeper Alex Ivanov said the team must stay positive moving forward. He called the team’s next game against Michigan State a “must-win.”“Well, we are 2-6-3 now and well, we have nothing to lose,” Ivanov said. “We got six guaranteed regular season games left, so the motivation there is to capture as many points out of those six games as we can and you always got to be looking forward.”OSU is set to play its next match in East Lansing, Mich., against Michigan State Oct. 13 at 1 p.m. read more

Football Michigan has best chance in Harbaugh era for win

Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh appeals to an official during the third quarter against Ohio State at Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor, Mich. on Nov. 25, 2017. Ohio State won, 31-20. Credit: Courtesy of TNSJim Harbaugh has coached Michigan to this point before. In 2016, Michigan’s head coach guided his Wolverines to Columbus with only one loss and a No. 3 ranking in the College Football Playoff rankings. In his second season at the helm, he exceeded expectations, and Michigan finally looked better than Ohio State.Yet, the Wolverines lost.In 2017, Michigan hosted an Ohio State team that had two losses and again, looked like a vulnerable titan.Still, the Wolverines lost.Now, Harbaugh has guided the team to the brink again. His Wolverines are No. 4 in the nation. They are in a position to win the Big Ten East with a victory Saturday. They are favored against the Buckeyes. “I think this season ends up, kind of, all for not if you don’t win the Big Ten. If you don’t beat Ohio State. If you don’t go to the playoff,” Cody Stavenhagen, The Athletic’s Michigan beat writer, said. “One guy had told me that the trajectory of Michigan football has almost been sisyphean, so to the point where every time you think it’s getting better, you think Michigan is making progress, something happens. It doesn’t quite get there.”In Greek mythology, Sisyphus was punished by being forced to roll a boulder up a hill just for it to roll down at the end of the day, leaving him to repeat the act for the rest of time.Harbaugh has always been able to push that boulder up the hill. He’s led the Wolverines to more success now than they ever found under former head coach Brady Hoke. But every year, that last week of the season, the Buckeyes push that boulder back down the hill, leaving him to start again the next campaign.This Michigan team found the missing piece it has lacked in the past years of the Harbaugh era:  a quarterback. Shea Patterson, a former top-rated quarterback recruit, has completed 65.9 percent of his passes for 2,177 yards and 18 touchdown passes. He has only thrown four interceptions. Patterson has also rushed for 255 yards on 60 carries, punching in two touchdowns on the ground.In the past, Michigan has had the defense, the receivers and the running backs. It just didn’t have the signal-caller. Now, it has Patterson.“The defense is still the backbone of this Michigan and Karan Higdon in the running game is really what the offense is centered around,” Stavenhagen said. “But just the knowledge that Michigan has a quarterback with some unique abilities, capable of making plays, capable of making big throws on third down or in the fourth quarter… I think that really changes kind of the whole vibe of this team.”With a defense that ranks among the top in the nation statistically, Michigan has all the pieces needed to come into Columbus and beat a struggling Ohio State team that was humiliated by Purdue and surrendered 51 points to Maryland, a team that scored three against Michigan State.It has been a long time since Michigan entered the matchup truly optimistic to win against Ohio State. Michigan Daily sports editor Max Marcovitch said it’s been rare in the past 15 years that Michigan has been regarded as a better team, and fans know this is the case.“I think Michigan fans are recognizing that if it’s ever going to happen, if the program is ever going to turn the corner and sort of get to that level at the top of the Big Ten, that this kind of has to be the year,” Marcovitch said.A loss, and this season is a wash. It’s another season during which Harbaugh pushed the boulder up the hill, but couldn’t get it over. To Wolverine fans, it is another lost season.“I certainly think you can’t call this a successful season at this point unless Michigan beats Ohio State and wins the Big Ten,” Marcovitch said.A win, and Harbaugh has just one hurdle to push his boulder over, at least for 2018. The winner of Ohio State and Michigan will go on to face Northwestern in the Big Ten championship game. Harbaugh has never made it to that game, having watched Michigan State’s Mark Dantonio, Penn State’s James Franklin and Ohio State’s Urban Meyer all hoist that trophy during his tenure.Michigan would be heavily favored to beat Northwestern, a 7-4 Big Ten West champion of the  considerably weaker half of the conference. Beat Ohio State. Win the Big Ten. Reach the College Football Playoff. All would be firsts in the Harbaugh era. Everything else after that in 2018 would just be gravy.“A Big Ten championship and a College Football Playoff appearance would be a huge success, especially after the way this season started,” Marcovitch said. “And anything beyond that I think is extra. Now if you ask fans that two weeks from now and Michigan’s playing Alabama, a lot of them will have talked themselves into it.”The boulder is back up the hill. The question remains: Will Harbaugh be able to get it that one step further, or will he watch in dismay as it rolls back down, waiting to be moved again in August 2019? read more

Western Isles fishermen seek compensation over grounded oil rig

first_imgTransocean Winner Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Dalmore Experts say the oil that has escaped so far has been dispersed or evaporated and has not polluted the shoreline.Meanwhile, Don Mackay, of the local community association, said it was “highly regrettable” that representatives of the rig’s owners, the coastguard, the salvage company trying to rescue the structure, and the UK Government official in charge of the operation had not attended the meeting. A coastguard helicopter winches a salvage expert on boardCredit:PA Fishermen are planning to claim compensation after being prevented from entering lobster grounds due to an exclusion zone around a grounded oil rig in the Western Isles.The semi-submersible rig, Transocean Winner, was being towed from Norway to Malta, and then to Turkey to be broken up, when it was blown ashore at Dalmore on the Isle of Lewis during a storm last week.Local residents called at a public meeting on Monday night for the rig to be beached in the area and scrapped locally to provide jobs on the island.There was also a warning from a fishermen’s leader that the grounding was an “accident waiting to happen”. Police and coastguard at a road leading to Dalmore beachCredit:PA He added: “If that had been an oil tanker there would have been further devastation along the whole west coast.”From a marine point of view it was expected to happen sometime. It was bound to happen.”The main fear is that it will be stuck there, that’s the biggest fear we have. There’s no point in towing it away if its going to sink.”Around 12,000 gallons of diesel escape from two tanks that were ruptured on the rig, after a tow rope become detached from a tug during the storm, and Mr MacInnes said he also had concerns about heavy duty oil that may still be on board. From a marine point of view it was expected to happen sometime. It was bound to happenDuncan MacInnes, Western Isles Fishermens’ Association They are expected to attend another public meeting in the same hall on Thursday, when they say they will give an up to date assessment of the situation.Donald MacLeod, a Western Isles councillor, called for the rig to be dismantled at the Arnish fabrication yard near Stornoway.He added: “It should be towed to Arnish and scrapped and create at least 100 jobs over 12 months instead of towing it half way around the world.”Smit Salvage has confirmed that another two diesel oil tanks in the hull are intact and there are plans to transfer the oil to separate tanks above the water line.There is not expected to be any attempt to refloat the rig until near the end of the month. Duncan MacInnes, secretary of the Western Isles Fishermens’ Association, said a 300 metre exclusion zone around the 17,000 tonne rig meant that at least four lobster boats could not currently work the area and would be seeking thousands of pounds in compensation.He added that the rig was using the route west of the islands that was recommended by the UK Government and claimed that “nobody in their right mind would have gone to the west in that weather”.”From the fishing industry point of view, we want them to go through the Minch with compulsory pilotage,” said Mr MacInnes.“There’s cost cutting going on in the oil industry. We have escaped relatively lightly from this. This could happen again if these vessels are allowed to carry on.last_img read more

€130000 donated to charity as 45000 kind deeds logged

first_imgA host of well-known faces supported the campaign including Stephen Fry, Graham Norton, Leo Cullen, Paul Galvin, Sean O’Brien, Anne Doyle, Jason Sherlock, Amy Huberman and many more.Read: Lads caught on CCTV… fixing a bike rack at 3am>Read: Company hopes to make doing good deeds that little bit sweeter> ELECTRIC IRELAND HAS announced that it has donated €130,000 to three charities after 45,000 kind deeds were logged as part of the Kindness Week campaign.The company asked people to do an act of kindness and log them online in favour of one of three charities – Childline, Special Olympics and Breakthrough Cancer Research.Kind deeds were recorded in Australia, the US the UK, Canada, throughout Europe and Malaysia, through social networking sites and texts.Today, Childline, having received the most pledged deeds, was presented with a cheque for €60,000. Electric Ireland also gave cheques of €40,000 and €30,000 respectively to Special Olympics Ireland and Breakthrough Cancer Research.Mary Gamble of Childline said the funds will enable the charity to recruit, train and develop new volunteers which will be based across the eight regional offices across the country answering calls from children around Ireland.Here are just some of the deeds registered:“I promised my Mam I would study for the Leaving Cert.”“I’m helping an entrepreneur in financial struggle, by doing his website for free.”“I changed the wheel for a lady in my local shopping centre last Sunday morning. It was raining and she had a small baby with her.”“I have being helping out my elderly neighbour following their hip replacement lighting fires and cooking all their meals for them, when my mother died they were of great support to me and this I feel is the very least I can do to repay the ultimate kindness that they showed to me during what was such a very difficult period in my life. I will be donating mine to Breakthrough Cancer Research.”“I work with children with intellectual disabilities and myself and another staff member brought lots of new toys to the service and the children now have lots to do when they come to respite.”last_img read more

US Airways flight makes emergency landing at Dublin Airport

first_imgA US AIRWAYS flight was forced to return to Dublin Airport this afternoon after experiencing electrical problems in the air.A spokesperson for Dublin Airport Authority confirmed that the flight, which had left Dublin this afternoon for Philadephia, landed safely. The DAA’s fire brigade attended the landing as a precaution but the incident has now been stood down.A source told TheJournal.ie that a full emergency had been declared due to electrical problems while the aircraft was in the air, not long after it left the airport.Read: ‘Severe turbulence’ caused loss of altitude on United Airlines flight to Dublin>last_img read more

Elder Scrolls Online to add microtransactions on top of subscription

first_imgJust yesterday, we learned that the upcoming Elder Scrolls MMORPG, The Elder Scrolls Online (TESO), would officially employ a standard subscription-based model that is so rare nowadays. Now, we learned that TESO will also implement a cash shop on top of that system.Whenever an MMO in the post-WoW world releases with a subscription model, the gaming world takes bets on how long that model will last until the game switches over to free-to-play. Even prevalent, popular properties handled by beloved developers can’t get away with a subscription model anymore — just look at what happened with Star Wars: The Old Republic. Even World of Warcraft is losing subscriptions at an alarming rate. For all the hate the free-to-play cash shop model receives, gamers have deemed it the model of choice by opting to play those games more than ones that require a subscription. However, it seems we’re still not past that subscription mentality, and TESO will give it a go.What’s different about TESO, though, is that it will include a cash shop on top of that model, giving players the worst of both worlds — a subscription and microtransactions.Director of The Elder Scrolls Online, Matt Firor, confirmed to AusGamers the inclusion of the cash shop. He stated it won’t include in-game bonus points, but will include fun stuff (we assume that means things like cosmetics, as is standard MMO cash shop practice), as well as services like name changes.When done right, free-to-play models and cash shops are totally fine. Games like Dungeons and Dragons Online have a great cash shop model, where games like Defiance have an ideal one-time purchase model where the extra cash shop is completely superfluous, but allows you to purchase some cosmetics. So, while a subscription is still an odd move for TESO, the cash shop could easily not pose a threat to the gameplay experience. However, “this game has a subscription and a cash shop” is not an immediately positive statement to hear.last_img read more

199 Bose Frames Audio Sunglasses Arrive in January

first_imgStay on target When Bose shared its audio augmented reality sunglasses concept earlier this year, we all assumed it was a tech demo, destined to gather dust alongside the 2201 speaker and Aviation Headset X.Boy were we wrong.The electronics maker this week unveiled Frames, a “revolutionary” wearable that combines premium sunglasses, wireless headphones, and AR in one pocket-sized device.Available now for pre-order, the $199 specs can stream music and information, take and make calls, and access virtual assistants via the “tiniest, thinnest, most lightweight Bose system ever.”Miniaturized Bose electronics are hidden in the temples (via Bose)“Bose Frames are both revolutionary and practical,” product director Mehul Trivedi said in a statement. “They look and act like classic sunglasses—until you turn them on.“And then you’re connected to your phone, contacts, the Web, and all its audible content, just like headphones,” he continued. “There’s nothing else like them—they’re a breakthrough you have to see, wear, and hear to believe.”Even more impressive is its audio AR platform, which uses sound (as well as a 9-axis head motion sensor and smartphone GPS) instead of sight to relay information.Of course, the functionality won’t be available until later next year; an update on Bose AR is expected during March’s annual SXSW conference.Exclusive technologies and custom speakers direct sound at you and away from others (via Bose)So once Frames hit shelves in January, they will be initially limited to micro-acoustics and voice control—which is still pretty cool, if you ask me.Choose between two styles: square and angled Alto, or round and slightly smaller Rondo. Both block up to 99 percent of UVA/UVB rays, and are scratch and shatter resistant.Battery life, however, leaves something to be desired: Bose Frames last up to 3.5 hours during playback and 12 hours on standby, but can be fully charged in less than two hours.More coverage on Geek.com:Say Goodnight to Restless Slumber with Bose Noise-Masking SleepbudsSnapchat’s New Snap Spectacles Will Have Two Cameras, Cost $350Stay Sharp in NASA-Certified Sunglasses Geek Pick: Bose Headphones 700 Cancel All the NoiseSay Goodnight to Restless Slumber with Bose Noise-Masking Sleepbuds last_img read more

Dybala Juve are keen on ending Champions League jinx

first_imgPaulo Dybala has clearly stated the primary aim for Juventus this season is to win the Champions League trophy.La Joya as he is fondly called equally revealed he ’d love to reunite with long-term pal Paul Pogba in a recent chat with Telefoot and cited on Football Italia“I’d always like to play with someone of his level. Whatever decision he makes, I always wish him the best of luck,” replied Dybala.“Everyone knows how important Cristiano Ronaldo is for us and what he represents for our opponents too. He gives everything, whether it’s in training or a match situation, and also sets a good example for youngsters.Report: No deadline day move for Dybala George Patchias – September 2, 2019 There will be no last-minute transfer of Paulo Dybala from Juventus this summer.According to Sky Sports and its associates in Italy, the player is…“I’d say Lionel Messi and Ronaldo are on the same level. As for the future, Neymar and above all Kylian Mbappé have what it takes to match them.“As for myself, I have changed my style of play recently and learned so much by working with great champions. It’s quite a mature and experienced squad in Turin, but that really helps a young player like me, because you learn and absorb their mentality.”Juventus face Atletico Madrid in the Champions League Round of 16 next month and having reached the final twice in recent years, are making no secret of their ambitions.“The Champions League is the main objective for us this season and we’ll do everything we can to win it. Atletico Madrid are, along with Liverpool, the worst side we could’ve picked in the draw.”last_img read more

FWC continue searching for body of watercraft rider

first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission announced, Tuesday, that they are still searching for the body of a missing man who fell off a personal watercraft.Divers and officials were on the scene continuing their recovery efforts in the Blue Lagoon, one day after witnesses said the victim hit a wave before falling into the lake, Monday. The search area in the Blue Lagoon is located between the airport and Northwest Seventh Street, off the Dolphin Expressway.Family members identified the victim as 32-year-old Manuel Aponte. Aponte is a husband and also a father of a 1-year-old son, according to family members.“We’re broken,” said the victim’s cousin, who wished to be called Sam. “I don’t believe it, you know. That’s the only thing I can say.”Related: Officials: ‘Recovery efforts’ ongoing for missing watercraft riderSam said Monday afternoon was meant to be a fun day on the water before the events became tragic.According to witnesses, Aponte was riding a personal watercraft with a group when he hit a wave and fell into the water.7 Skyforce HD flew overhead capturing the recovery efforts by divers and rescue crews, Tuesday. FWC worked alongside Miami-Dade Police, using sonar devices to help find the missing body. “We did find the watercraft that was floating. We did also locate a life vest that was also floating in the water,” said Miami Dade Fire Rescue Captain Ignacious Carroll. “It has not been determined whether or not it belongs to him or not.”Security guard Rick Rojo told 7News he saw the rider going up and splashing into the lagoon after he hit the wave. “It’s almost like he hit something,” he said. “I’m not sure. The JetSki almost came to a full stop, and he just catapulted over it, landed head first, feet in the air.”Friends circled around to the spot where the rider fell but were unable to locate him. “His friends saw him as they went back by, they saw his abandoned JetSki, and they pointed out to me, ‘Look! That’s where he went in. That’s where he went in,’” said Rojo. “And they started looking for him.”Officials faced issues of their own in their search for Aponte, Monday evening. “You can imagine with the lagoon, you got the waters that are very murky. You got a lot of seaweed that is down there,” Carroll said, “so it’s not going to be a very easy search.”Recovery efforts remain ongoing as family members have stayed on the scene waiting for official word on their loved one. FWC are leading this investigation and plan to continue its search and survey the Blue Lagoon throughout Tuesday evening.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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first_imgNews | June 08, 2015 Center for Biomedical Research Partners With Florida Proton Center in Clinical Registry Initiative will monitor clinical outcomes and long-term follow-up of cancer patients receiving proton therapy News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more Following radiation, the bone marrow shows nearly complete loss of blood cells in mice (left). Mice treated with the PTP-sigma inhibitor displayed rapid recovery of blood cells (purple, right). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communications News | Radiation Therapy | August 16, 2019 Drug Accelerates Blood System’s Recovery After Radiation, Chemotherapy A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 Mevion and C-RAD Release Integration for Improved Proton Therapy Treatment Quality Mevion Medical Systems and C-RAD announced the integration between the C-RAD Catalyst PT and the Mevion S250i proton… read more News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. The MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center expansion is expected to be completed in 2023. Rendering courtesy of Stantec. News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more center_img News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more Image courtesy of Imago Systems News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 07, 2019 Qfix kVue One Proton Couch Top Validated by Mevion Medical Systems Qfix and Mevion Medical Systems announced that a special version of the kVue One Proton couch top is now both validated… read more June 8, 2015 – The Center for Biomedical Research (CBR) is partnering with the Ackerman Cancer Center as part of a clinical meta-registry for clinical outcomes and long-term follow-up of cancer patients receiving proton therapy.Ackerman has joined the registry study developed and managed by the CBR in collaboration with the Provision Center for Proton Therapy. The registry study meets all guidelines as outlined in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s (AHRQ) guidelines for Registries for Evaluating Patient Outcomes.”With the PRO 0425 study, we are collecting data that will allow us to compare information across disease sites and treatment modalities and provide a unique window into the long-term effectiveness of proton therapy,” said Marcio Fagundes, M.D., medical director for Provision Center for Proton Therapy and principal investigator.Located in Jacksonville, Fla., Ackerman is the first private, physician-owned practice to offer proton therapy. The center began treating patients in late April.The Center for Biomedical Research (CBR) specializes in the management of clinical trials and has a lengthy history of managing groundbreaking clinical trials such as Herceptin, Avastin and most recently Imbruvica, of which CBR was the only clinical research site in the Southeastern United States. The Center for Biomedical Research has managed hundreds of clinical trials with a particular focus on medical oncology, proton therapy and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. CBR is regionally noted for its expertise in conducting pharmaceutical trials targeting smaller, rare cancers with specific tumor mutations.For more information: www.biomed-research.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Catalyst PT image courtesy of C-RAD News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more News | Proton Therapy | August 08, 2019 MD Anderson to Expand Proton Therapy Center The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center unveiled plans to expand its Proton Therapy Center during a… read more Related Contentlast_img read more

VIDEO INTERVIEW Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging Strategy

first_img Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. VIDEO INTERVIEW: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:44Loaded: 3.52%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:44 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Recent Videos View all 606 items Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more SCCT news and videoscenter_img Conference Coverage View all 396 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Videos | Enterprise Imaging | May 22, 2018 VIDEO INTERVIEW: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging Strategy Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Information Technology View all 220 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Find more SCCT news and videos FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr interviews Kim Garriott, Principal Consultant, LogicalisThe rapidly expanding volume of unstructured data, exemplified by medical images, underscores the need to develop an enterprise imaging strategy, says Kim Garriott, principal consultant at Logicalis, a global provider of IT solutions and managed services.In the accompanying video interview, Garriott explains how the combination of these two may form a convincing argument for the leadership of your organization to move forward with enterprise imaging.On June 1, at the upcoming SIIM 2018 convention, she will co-host the continuing education session “Achieving Enterprise Imaging Maturity,” during which she and the HIMSS-SIIM Workgroup will present the new Digital Imaging Adoption Maturity Model. DIAM, as it is called, is designed to support real-time collaboration and patient-centric care by providing a method to address enterprise-wide imaging challenges. When developing an enterprise imaging strategy, organizations must consider their specific needs, which are characterized in “use cases.” Garriott, who is the global chair of the HIMSS analytic DIAM Development team and co-chair of the HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging Workgroup, explains that these use cases constitute one very important element of the enterprise imaging strategy. Another is construction of a “data governance model.” This model is needed to guide the capture of data and is essential to the success of enterprise imaging.Editor’s Note: This pre-SIIM video interview is the first in a series of three by ITN Contributing Editor, Greg Freiherr. The series features industry luminaries discussing key issues associated with the upcoming SIIM conference.Related Video: ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis discusses, “Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption Model” with Kim Garriott at HIMSS 2018. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Technology Reports View all 9 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Women’s Health View all 62 items Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

Heart Attack Stroke Risks Increase Leading Up to Cancer Diagnosis

first_img News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more Related Content News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more News | Cardio-oncology | December 21, 2018 Heart Attack, Stroke Risks Increase Leading Up to Cancer Diagnosis Risk greatest in people with later-stage cancers and lung and colon cancers News | Colonoscopy Systems | August 06, 2019 Rise in Early Onset Colorectal Cancer Not Aligned With Screening Trends A new study finds that trends in colonoscopy rates did not fully align with the increase in colorectal cancer (CRC) in… read more News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more Image courtesy of Imago Systems News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 07, 2019 Contrast Use in First Transthoracic Echocardiogram for Heart Failure Reduces Repeat Testing Heart failure is the fourth most common cause for all admission to U.S. hospitals, and it is the most common reason for… read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more December 21, 2018 — Older adults with cancer are more likely to have had a heart attack or stroke in the months prior to their cancer diagnosis, according to a report published online in Blood. The study compared this group with similar adults who do not have cancer during the same period. Lung and colon cancers, as well as advanced-staged cancers, appear to be most strongly associated with an elevated risk of heart attack and stroke caused by blood clots in the arteries.The study is the largest and most systematic evaluation of these events leading up to a cancer diagnosis, according to researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian, and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.”Our data show there is an associated risk of ischemic stroke and heart attack that begins to increase in the five months before the cancer is officially diagnosed and peaks in the month just before,” said lead study author Babak Navi, M.D., MS, an associate professor of neurology in the Department of Neurology and of neuroscience in the Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute at Weill Cornell Medicine, and a neurologist at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center. “These results suggest that cancer’s effect on the clotting system may be what’s predominantly driving the associated risk of heart attacks and stroke.”Cancers can take months and sometimes years to develop and be diagnosed, and some cancers may be exerting biological effects on the body, especially thromboembolic activity, before they come to medical attention, he explained.Researchers used information from a Medicare database linked to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. They retrospectively looked at the risk of heart attack and stroke in people 67 years and older who were newly diagnosed with breast, lung, prostate, colorectal, bladder, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, uterine, pancreatic, and gastric cancers from Jan. 1, 2005, to Dece. 31, 2013. Together, these cancers account for two-thirds of all cancer diagnoses in the United States. The study included 748,662 Medicare beneficiaries and compared patients with cancer to matched controls during the 360 days before the cancer diagnosis.Overall, the risk of having a heart attack and stroke jumped by 70 percent in the year before cancer diagnosis. The risk was most acute in the month immediately before cancer diagnosis. During this time, patients who were later diagnosed with cancer were more than five times more likely to have a heart attack or stroke compared with those who did not have cancer – 2,313 of cancer patients had an event compared with 413 of matched controls. Beyond five months before a cancer diagnosis, the risks of these events were similar in both groups. The rate of heart attack or stroke was highest in adults with lung and colorectal cancers and those with stage 3 or 4 disease. When analyzed separately, both heart attack and stroke risk were increased in the months before cancer diagnosis, although heart attack events were slightly more common than strokes. Secondary analyses of additional arterial thromboembolic event types (i.e., thromboembolism of arteries supplying the peripheral limbs or mesentery) further substantiated the primary findings.The data confirm the association of heart attack and stroke with cancer development and delineate when the risk starts and its relative magnitude, said Navi, who is also chief of the Division of Stroke and Hospital Neurology in the Department of Neurology at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell.”Our findings suggest that cancer could be a risk factor for arterial thromboembolism, so people who have a heart attack or stroke should be up-to-date with their age- and gender-specific cancer screenings, such as mammograms and colonoscopies,” Navi added. “If someone has a heart attack or stroke and there are any concerning signs for an undiagnosed malignancy, such as weight loss or unexplained anemia, then perhaps a cancer screening should be considered.”Navi and his team are planning future research studies to better understand what blood or imaging biomarkers could serve as clues to occult cancer in patients with arterial thromboembolism, as well as what the utility of body computed tomography (CT) imaging or other cancer screening tools might be in these patients, particularly in those whose strokes or heart attacks are otherwise unexplained. Navi also stressed that more investigations are needed to determine the exact cause of arterial thromboembolism in patients with cancer and the optimal strategies to prevent and treat these events.The use of claims data did not allow the researchers to account for lifestyle factors, such as smoking status, event severity or how interruptions in blood thinning therapies prior to surgical procedures may have played a role. As well, some of the events could have led to a cancer diagnosis because of increased medical surveillance and testing.This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.For more information: www.bloodjournal.orgReference1. Navi B.B., Reiner A.S., Kamel H., et al. Arterial thromboembolic events preceding the diagnosis of cancer in older persons. Blood, Dec. 21, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1182/blood-2018-06-860874 FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Breast Imaging | August 02, 2019 Volpara to Distribute Screenpoint Medical’s Transpara AI Solution Volpara Solutions and ScreenPoint Medical BV signed an agreement under which Volpara will sell ScreenPoint’s Transpara… read morelast_img read more