Barclays could face prosecution after judge derides £190m settlement offer

first_imgTuesday 17 August 2010 8:12 pm More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBill Gates reportedly hoped Jeffrey Epstein would help him win a Nobelnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.com Barclays could face prosecution after judge derides £190m settlement offer Tags: NULL Share Show Comments ▼ Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeUndoTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastUndoTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island FarmUndomoneycougar.comThis Proves The Osmonds Weren’t So Innocentmoneycougar.comUndoinvesting.comCanceled TV Shows Announced: Full Updated Listinvesting.comUndozenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comUndothedelite.comNetflix Cancellations And Renewals: The Full List For 2021thedelite.comUndoDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyUndoWorld LifestyleCouple Has No Idea Why Photo Goes Viral, Then They Notice This In The CornerWorld LifestyleUndocenter_img BARCLAYS is nervously awaiting the outcome of a legal case in the US today that could leave the banking group facing criminal charges over payments linked to countries barred from trading with the States. A federal judge, who will decide whether to accept Barclays’ $298m (£190m) offer to settle the case, called the bank’s agreement “a sweetheart deal” in court yesterday and asked: “Why isn’t the government getting rough with these banks?”District Judge Emmet Sullivan has scheduled a hearing for today to decide whether to approve the deferred prosecution agreement between Barclays and US prosecutors. The case relates to transactions worth about $500m made between 1995 and 2006, where Barclays masked money coming into the US from countries including Cuba, Iran, Libya, Sudan and Myanmar. Barclays has accepted and acknowledged its actions, which prosecutors say were in breach of the Trading with the Enemy Act and the International Emergency Economic Powers Act. Credit Suisse, Lloyds TSB and ABN AMRO have all settled similar cases in recent months. It is the second time in a week Obama’s government has suffered criticism over deals cut with banks, after a judge refused to settle Citigroup’s $75m case concerning subprime mortgages on Monday. whatsapp whatsapp KCS-content last_img read more

Mitie targets outsourced jobs

first_img by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesWanderoamIdentical Twins Marry Identical Twins – But Then The Doctor Says, “STOP”WanderoamNoteabley25 Funny Notes Written By StrangersNoteableyZen HeraldNASA’s Voyager 2 Has Entered Deep Space – And It Brought Scientists To Their KneesZen HeraldHistorical GeniusHe Was The Smartest Man Who Ever Lived – But He Led A Miserable LifeHistorical GeniusMagellan TimesThis Is Why The Roy Rogers Museum Has Been Closed For GoodMagellan Times whatsapp Show Comments ▼ More From Our Partners UK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.org SUPPORT services firm Mitie said it plans to cash in on growing government outsourcing in the next 12 months, as it reported a 12 per cent growth in pre-tax profit for the latest half. Mitie said yesterday pre-tax profit for the six months to the end of September was £47.5m, while revenue grew 14.7 per cent from last year to £918.7m, largely due to recent acquisitions. “We see a number of opportunities in the public sector, in social housing, at the ministry of justice, within education and property in particular,” chief executive Ruby McGregor-Smith told City A.M. The firm said in an update it was speaking to the cabinet office about taking on more public sector work, with the first contracts expected in spring 2011. Mitie, which already provides security in English and Welsh courts, is bidding for work including prisoner escorting, community service and property management. McGregor-Smith emphasised the strength of its social housing business, which makes up 40 per cent of its property management revenue, despite underlying profit in the division falling 8.1 per cent to £12.4m. “More consolidation in the sector and good organic growth across our contracts means we are very positive about the market,” she said. Seymour Pierce analyst Caroline de La Soujeole upgraded her rating from “reduce” to “add”, adding in a research note: “This morning’s results show that the company is clearly making good progress on its strategy of becoming a provider of integrated facilities management and … is now evolving in areas with higher growth and higher margin potential.” KCS-content center_img whatsapp Share Mitie targets outsourced jobs Monday 22 November 2010 7:16 pm Tags: NULLlast_img read more

Tory rebels fail in vote to curb Brussels’ power

first_img KCS-content Read This Next’Pose’ Creator Steven Canals on Life After His Groundbreaking Show: ‘I’mThe Wrap’The Boys’ Star Aya Cash Took Inspiration From YouTube, TikTok and SteveThe WrapHow HGTV’s ‘Renovation Island’ Changed Bryan and Sarah Baeumler’sThe Wrap’Bridgerton’ Stars Phoebe Dynevor and Nicola Coughlan on Daphne andThe WrapBest Wine Gifts & Wine Accessories at Every PriceGayot’Hitman’s Bodyguard’s Wife’ Earns $17 Million 5-Day Opening as Box OfficeThe WrapFox News’ Mark Levin Says Capitol Riot Suspects ‘Would Be Treated Better’The WrapEverything We Know, or Think We Know, About the Time-Keepers on ‘Loki’The Wrap’The Crown’: What Went Into Finding Princess Diana and Margaret ThatcherThe Wrap by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeTaco RelishOnly People With An IQ Of 130 Can Name These ItemsTaco RelishZen HeraldThe Truth About Why ’40s Actor John Wayne Didn’t Serve In WWII Has Come To LightZen HeraldNews SharperGrab A Tissue Before You See Richard Simmons At 72News SharperDefinitionDesi Arnaz Kept This Hidden Throughout The Filming of ‘I Love Lucy’DefinitionTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island FarmMoneyPailBurning Money: Common Cars Rapidly DepreciatingMoneyPailNext RefinanceFishermen See Animal On Iceberg, But Then Look CloserNext RefinanceGameday NewsNFL Hall Of Famers Who Probably Don’t Deserve To Be In CantonGameday News whatsapp Tory rebels fail in vote to curb Brussels’ power Tuesday 11 January 2011 8:22 pmcenter_img whatsapp Share Show Comments ▼ Tags: NULL PRIME Minister David Cameron survived a test of his party leadership yesterday after eurosceptic Conservative rebels failed to win backing for tougher curbs on the flow of power to Brussels from Britain.Only 39 MPs voted for an amendment declaring the sovereignty of the UK parliament in relation to EU laws, while 314 voted against.The flagship European Union bill, which has survived a vote to halt its passage into law, is meant to defend Britain against unwanted EU rulings and laws and would mean any wholesale changes at EU level would have to pass a British referendum.Conservative Europe minister David Lidington said the legislation would shore up sovereignty and give ministers next to no “wriggle room” on Europe. “Any future changes to EU treaties, however minor, will need to be ratified by a full act of parliament,” Lidington said.But Conservative rebel Bill Cash said that “without a doubt” the bill had been watered down as a result of the coalition arrangements – part of an “alarming stream of acquiescence.” “Which is more important, the coalition or the national interest and the sovereignty of parliament?,” Cash asked. last_img read more

E-Tranzact International Plc (ETRANZ.ng) Q12018 Interim Report

first_imgE-Tranzact International Plc (ETRANZ.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Technology sector has released it’s 2018 interim results for the first quarter.For more information about E-Tranzact International Plc (ETRANZ.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the E-Tranzact International Plc (ETRANZ.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: E-Tranzact International Plc (ETRANZ.ng)  2018 interim results for the first quarter.Company ProfileE-Tranzact International Plc is a technology company in Nigeria offering services for electronic transaction switching and payment processing. The company has operations in Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Cote d’Ivoire and the United Kingdom. E-Tranzact International Plc has established partnerships with universities, government authorities, parastatals, financial institutions, technology firms and aviation companies offering solutions for everything from cash dispensing machines and international money transfers to payments of salaries and third parties. BankIT is an alternative payment option that is accessible through multiple electronic channels; eTranzact CorporatePay allows private organisations and government agencies to automatically handle third party and salary payments; mCommerce is a mobile banking application; eRemit is an online international money transfer service; eTranzact Strong Authentication provides two-factor authentication for ATM, POS, mobile and web transactions; ATM CardlexCash is a global payment network; eTranzact WebConnect accepts and processes merchant payments; eTranzact PayOutlet allows merchants to collect payments from customers through eTranzact branches. eTranzact International is a subsidiary of eTranzact Global Limited. Its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. E-Tranzact International Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Computer Warehouse Group Plc (CWG.ng) 2019 Annual Report

first_imgComputer Warehouse Group Plc (CWG.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Technology sector has released it’s 2019 annual report.For more information about Computer Warehouse Group Plc (CWG.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Computer Warehouse Group Plc (CWG.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Computer Warehouse Group Plc (CWG.ng)  2019 annual report.Company ProfileComputer Warehouse Group Plc is an information and communication technology company in Nigeria offering integrated ICT solutions to commercial enterprises in sub-Saharan Africa. The company operates through three divisions: CWL Systems, DCC Networks and Expert Edge Software. Cloud Services include OpenMall, a platform that aggregates all the stores hosted on an e-commerce platform; and SMERP, an Enterprise Resource Planning platform built to enable small and medium enterprises to manage their business operations efficiently. Software services includes software development and deployment, systems integration, software implementation, software support services and software enhancement and customization. Managed services simplify the management of a customer’s computing environment and optimises operations, reduces IT pressure and helps control costs while improving service levels. IT Infrastructure services is the flagship division of Computer Warehouse Group Plc, providing infrastructure and expertise in the supply, installation, integration and support of IT hardware for middleware systems, ATMs and servers and storage platforms. CWG Training offers training support for hardware and software installations. Computer Warehouse Group Plc has partnered with global IT companies the likes of Oracle, Infosys, Wincor, IBM and VMWare. The company’s head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Computer Warehouse Group Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Video: Archbishop Welby preaches at ACC-16 Opening Eucharist

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA ACC16, Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Archbishop of Canterbury, Submit a Press Release Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Video Video: Archbishop Welby preaches at ACC-16 Opening Eucharist New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ This is the text of the sermon, as delivered by Archbishop Justin Welby at the opening eucharist of ACC-16 at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Lusaka, Zambia, on 10 April 2016.As Archbishop Justin gave his sermon, it was translated in to the Chewa language by Father Samuel Mwanza.The readings at the service were: Deuteronomy 6:6-16, Psalm 1:1-6, Ephesians 4:8-16, and Matthew 28:16-20Father Sampson, thank you for translating. I am sure that the sermon you translate will be better than the sermon that I speak. So listen to him rather than me!The higher a tree grows, the more likely it is to need deep roots. When the storms come, only the roots make a difference. The older a society or a nation becomes, the more it needs to tell its story; so that in each generation we renew the sense of who we are and why we are here now.But telling the story is a dangerous process. We can keep hatred alive by telling the story of what we have suffered. In the United Kingdom, in one part of our country where there was 30 years of violence, we have to learn to tell the stories of reconciliation, not of hatred.So where our own history, as all histories have, contain tragedy and cruelty and sin; it is not only what story we tell, but how we tell it that makes the difference.A few weeks ago I went to Berlin in Germany with my wife. We visited a museum of German history. For the period from 1933 to 1989, the period of Hitler and of Communist control of East Germany, the story was told very well indeed. The facts were clear of the terrible things that happened. The museum explained why the world had given judgment against Germany. And yet the story was told so that visitors could think for themselves and themselves see why those horrors were serious.By the grace of God, Zambia does not have stories like that. And yet in every nation, the stories must be told well and the discipline of telling stories well is seen in our first two readings from Deuteronomy and Psalm 1.The book of Deuteronomy is Moses’ last will and testament. In it, he points to past mistakes and future dangers. He recalls to them the mercy of God that they have received and he recalls to them the promises of God that they have for the future. The book is a lesson in how to remember. Our reading starts with Deuteronomy saying ‘tell the story again and again to your children and grandchildren. And it was necessary that this should happen.When they first had the book, the Israelites were a pastoral people living in tents, raising livestock. But within a generation, after a series of wars, they conquered the land of Israel and settled in cities and towns.Do you remember what it is like to move for the countryside to the City? Many people here from the ACC, from Zimbabwe, Botswana, Malawi, and Zambia will remember such movements. Yet the step for the Israelites was much bigger. For 40 years they had lived with the visible presence of God in a pillar of fire by night and a pillar of smoke by day. They had lived in intimate relationship with God – close to God. Suddenly, they had neither a single leader, nor a single people, nor a single purpose. And suddenly, the pillar of fire had gone and they had the law to observe.In England in the 19th century, the move to the cities led to the church losing contact with the people. In the country, they were poor, but they had lived alongside one another: the clergy next to the farmers, and to the land owners. In the cities huge numbers of people were lost to view, and soon lost to the church.So what we see in Deuteronomy is a precaution against something that I am sure that you understand in this Province. And it is a precaution against something that we have suffered in England. Deuteronomy is a precaution against forgetting God when we are in the urban landscape, or in more comfort. It is a precaution against us changing God from someone who calls disciples to someone who is a tool for our own good.But how do we remember, what stories do we tell?Deuteronomy starts with saying to us that the stories must be about the God who has revealed Himself to us. We must not just tell the stories that we like. When our children were small we always read a Bible story with them each day. And if you have family at home, it is a good thing to do with children. But the problem with was that they liked some stories better than others. For example, they loved the book of Ruth, which we are studying in the ACC. But they found the books of the law and the prophets a bit more difficult. If we turned somewhere other than Ruth or Esther, or Nehemiah, or the Gospels, they would say: “No, no no, Dad. Give us something else.” And then they would say: “Dad, act out the story.” But to save you embarrassment I won’t do that today.So Deuteronomy is not only a book of rules and laws, but a tool to teach the way of God. And the people of Israel needed it. As soon as they settled in the land, they began to forget. God raised up Judges, and then Kings, but they still forget. Forgetting is natural to human beings. Too easily, we forget our history, we forget our values, we forget our God.Deuteronomy reappears centuries later when it is found in a wall of the Temple during repair work. When that happens it is read aloud to the King and causes a renewal of the faith of Israel, a return to holiness. God’s word, used properly, corrects both ignorance and sin.What we see in Deuteronomy is that memory must be based in the reality of the God who saves. The Israelites were to tell their children, in a ritual of question and answer, about the salvation and freedom God had given. Because they were to remember, when they were in a place of comfort, even a place of copper mines, if you look in Deuteronomy 8. That although they looked back to heroes who had led them in the past into freedom, those heroes were nothing without the God of justice and righteousness.It seems a long time ago and far away. Yet in this ACC we are guided by history. In this Province, whether in Malawi, in Zimbabwe, in Botswana and in Zambia, history matters; and in this nation of Zambia the story of Independence, the challenge of tribalism, the capacity to change governments peacefully – these are stories that matter.Those stories need telling, but they need telling in the way of Deuteronomy. They need telling with God at the centre of them. And more than that, because we are what the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church calls ‘a Jesus people’, we must tell the stories with the risen, living Jesus Christ at the centre of them.Every country which has a Christian heritage must have a Christian centre to nourish that heritage, and thus it must speak of liberation and reconciliation, of peace and human development. But it must always speak of them as the gift of a gracious God. In recognising our dependence on God, whether as individuals, as a church, as the ACC or as a nation, we find our true freedom.Secondly, the way we tell the story is set for us in Psalm 1. Because Psalm 1 describes righteousness as something which is sustainable, and evil as something which carries the promise of its own destruction. And so when we speak of the story of the church, of the story of the nation, of the story of society, we must speak of both righteousness and wickedness.In Burundi, a few weeks ago, I spent a few days with the church, and also with politicians. I have been going there since 2004 and I have seen their effort to overcome their civil war and find a common history in which to speak of their divisions. But once violence is in a society, finding your common history is so difficult – we have discovered that in Europe and in the UK. And for us as Anglicans, good history telling is not only centred in God but describes failures and successes honestly. And the way we tell our stories as a church, the way we tell them as a nation is tested by Psalm 1. It asks us: are you telling your stories in ways that demonstrate sustainable flourishing, development and life, or division and death?So when you speak and pray of countries in conflict, pray for them to find the right way to tell their history so they see the hand of God calling them to life, not death.It is the same for a nation. In the UK we are in the midst of a campaign for a referendum on whether we stay as part of the European Union or not. To date the campaign [on both sides] it seems to me risks being vague, unrealistic and negative. Psalm 1 describes what righteousness looks like in our message as Christians or indeed in a political campaign.Righteousness describes sustainability, not simply optimism. It describes strength and endurance, rather than hoping that something will simply turn up.Our message as a church, or our message as a nation, lacks righteousness when it is full of scoffing, injustice, violence and manipulation. And how often as Christians we need to repent of that in the church. We lack righteousness when we suggest power or leadership in church or nation or across the world is for the benefit of the winners only.We lack righteousness when we promise refreshment that has no source in God. When we do that, whether we are churches or whether we are nations or whether we are in politics or anywhere, we may call ourselves Christians but we act like atheists.So our history as a church, as it continues to be developed by this ACC, must be God-centred and righteousness pursuing. And whether it is in Zambia or elsewhere or in the UK, I pray that your elections will be God-centred. I pray that they will pursue righteousness. I pray that for my own country.But even so, to tell a story, to be a people of a story that is based in righteousness, is not enough. The church is called in the Letter to the Ephesians to build a whole new vision of what it is to be human. In Ephesians we see that through Jesus we are equipped to become what God calls us to be. This is a message for you and for me, for the church in our work of continuing the work of Christ, in our mission of setting lights shining in every community.Yes, we must tell a story of God’s liberation. Ephesians speaks of righteousness, it rebukes corruption, it condemns violence, it stands against everything that hinders the common good; it stands against all that hinders solidarity, justice, the treating of the earth’s resources as a God-given trust for all humanity. Yet, even more than that, towards the end of the reading that we had today, the Letter to the Ephesians calls the church to be a visual aid of what it means to be a complete human being. In the Ephesians we are called by Paul to maturity. And maturity in Ephesians means looking like Jesus Christ. Even if everyone agrees together, even if our own arguments prevail, we cannot be satisfied until we look like Jesus Christ.And the moment we remember that, we see the insanity of power struggles and faction fighting in the church. Because it is Christ who brings gifts, says the reading, and gives them across the church, to bring us to maturity. But too often, both as individuals or as groups within the church, we take the gift and we put it in our pocket and treat it as our own. And if we get it out, we get it out to use against someone next to us.Of course there will be debates and discussions. Paul talks about the need to resist wrong doctrine and calls for unity of faith. But we will only discern right and wrong when we listen and love. When we apply the gifts we are given unreservedly for the good of all those who call on the name of Christ.This works both globally and locally. In the week before Easter I was in a parish in Kent in my Diocese. It’s a very poor parish. The church had been built 150 years ago and like many churches in England was normally only used for a few hours a week. But in the last three years there has been a new priest, and this priest has started a community bank for micro-finance, and she provides food for the hungry. And then she realized that they needed to teach skills so that people would not be hungry. And then they taught them about family life. The church is now full of life, of service to the community, and it demonstrates to me what it is to grow into the likeness of Christ, and it’s being used every day of the week.Of course, the priest has not done that by herself. She has formed partnerships, seeing the gifts given by God, as in Ephesians, for the task to which he had called the church. They worship, they pray, and they bring people to faith in Christ. We must have no illusions: it is fragile and often messy. They discuss things, they make mistakes, but gifted by the Spirit they are growing into life.Can the ACC do that for the whole Communion, not just for itself? Can this wonderful Province go on doing that in Malawi, Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe? Because the question for all institutions nowadays, for all churches, in an era when it’s easy to get reports of what is really happening around us, the question for us is no longer only what we say but also what we do. That’s why I say, also, pray for your politicians, because they have a very difficult task and they need the gift and grace of God.Lastly we came to Matthew’s Gospel, because what do as God’s people is not for us but for the world and every human being living in it, and for the whole creation. The last thing Jesus does is to send his disciples out, he says: “Go.” One of my great predecessors, William Temple, said that the church exists for those who are not its members. We show that we come from Christ when we go out in humble and joy filled service; when we go out singing and dancing, when we rejoice in worship and are full of love, when we are not judgmental, when we do not fall into the old church habit of throwing stones at the weak and flattering the proud and the strong.That is such a hard thing for all of us, in the church or in government, to do. Do we serve the weak or do we flatter the strong? Is our message so full of Christ-centred hope that it creates societies of hope?. . .That is also the last test for all of us who are Christians. Jesus’s words at the end of Matthew say to us, is what you are doing about you? Or is it also about going out? Is it mainly about going out? And if it is about going out, which it must be, do we have so much of the good news alive in us that we consciously seek to introduce people to Jesus who has filled us with joy and hope?Pope Francis said a couple of years ago, why is it that so many people going out to talk about Jesus look as though they’re going to a funeral? So when you go out today, dance and rejoice! Because Jesus has so captured us with liberation, he has so guided and sustained us in righteousness, he has so equipped us for maturity, that we are to be the people who make disciples.Praise to Christ our risen Lord! Amen. Posted Apr 10, 2016 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Anglican Consultative Council, last_img read more

Episcopalians assess damage from Hurricane Michael’s destructive tear through Southeast

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopalians assess damage from Hurricane Michael’s destructive tear through Southeast Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books A man walks past buildings damaged by Hurricane Michael in Panama City, Florida, on Oct. 11. Photo: Reuters[Episcopal News Service] Episcopalians, congregations and dioceses across the Southeast again are assessing the damage and praying for the best after another powerful hurricane wreaked havoc on the communities in its path.Last month it was Hurricane Florence, which hit coastal North Carolina hard and also brought wind, rain and flooding to parts of South Carolina and Virginia and cities farther inland. On Oct. 10, Hurricane Michael made landfall near Panama City, Florida, as one of the strongest hurricanes ever to hit the mainland United States. At least two people are dead as Michael left buildings in ruin, blocked roads and power outages affecting hundreds of thousands.Michael weakened Oct. 11 to a tropical storm as it made its way across the Carolinas, dropping more rain on regions already struggling to bounce back from Florence. The latest storm is moving rapidly northeast and is expected to head out to sea by early Oct. 12.Episcopal Relief & Development, the agency that works at the churchwide level to help coordinate disaster response, began holding conference calls with dioceses before the storm hit, and that outreach continues as local leaders assess the needs of their communities.“Our partners are just beginning to assess the impact of Hurricane Michael,” Katie Mears, senior director of Episcopal Relief & Development’s U.S. Disaster Program, said in a press release. “We will continue to support church partners to serve and care for affected communities in the weeks and months ahead.”Michael intensified surprisingly fast into a Category 4 hurricane before hitting land, forcing residents and church leaders to expedite their preparations and evacuations.In the Diocese of Florida, Christ Church in Monticello shared photos on its Facebook page of volunteers boarding up the church’s windows on Oct. 9. “Hope everyone remains safe as Michael approaches,” the post said.Farther west along the Florida Panhandle, in the Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast, the Rev. Thomas Dwyer was bracing for the worst.“I hope this finds you all busily completing your preparations,” he told his Port St. Joe congregation in an Oct. 9 post on the St. James’ Episcopal Church’s Facebook page. “Since we will likely lose power, I wanted to get this out early. Please, if you are staying in the area, make sure that wherever you are is safe, and stay indoors.”Dwyer told Episcopal News Service by email on Oct. 11 that he fled the city before the hurricane. He heard from someone who made it to the church afterward that the building was damaged but survived the hurricane.“Lots of shingles blown off and a chain-link fence down, but sounds like structurally it is OK,” he said. “I will hopefully get back Saturday and then I’ll know more.”The Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast posted hurricane preparation info prominently on its website well before Hurricane Michael arrived, and Bishop Russell Kendrick issued a statement Oct. 9 offering prayers and support to the members of his diocese, which includes the western Panhandle of Florida and southern Alabama. He followed up Oct. 11 with a video message.Kendrick and other diocesan leaders gathered for a morning staff meeting Oct. 11 to share updates on the storm’s aftermath and plan their next steps. Communication has been difficult in some areas, so information was still flowing in from various congregations.“We do know that there has been damage to several of our church buildings,” Kendrick said. He didn’t have details but identified the churches with confirmed damage as Holy Nativity Episcopal Church and St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Panama City, Grace Episcopal Church in Panama City Beach and St. James’ in Port St. Joe.A similar assessment was underway in the Diocese of Georgia, which encompasses the southern half of the state. The diocese had been tracking congregations through an alert system, and by Oct. 11 more than 100 messages had come in, according to Katie Willoughby, the diocese’s canon for administration.Bainbridge, Georgia, was one of the communities in the diocese reporting the most damage, Willoughby told ENS by phone. Thomasville, Albany and Americus also were hit hard, but most of the damage reported so far was downed trees. Church buildings seemed intact.“Generally, we came through well; however, we have some significant tree damage,” she said. Several parishioners also reported trees falling onto their homes.Information is only trickling in about the congregations in Panama City, the small Gulf Coast city that was in the direct line of the storm. News reports from that region paint an alarming picture.A 300-bed hospital in Panama City was forced to evacuate Oct. 11 after the hurricane turned parts of the complex into tatters. The storm wiped out the roofs of high-rise condos, knocked down trees, tossed boats around like toys, and left the city looking like a “complete war zone,” according to one Facebook user who posted video of the destruction.The Rev. Steve Bates, who fled Panama City before the storm with his wife, posted a forlorn update Oct. 11 on the Facebook page of Holy Nativity Episcopal Church, where Bates is rector.“My heart is broken for our community. In just a few hours, all of our lives were changed,” Bates said. “But what remains the same is the loving, caring, and giving of those who call Panama City home.”He wasn’t sure if his own home sustained damage in the storm, nor could he say anything about the condition of the church, but he hoped for updates soon. “The work ahead is daunting, but I know beyond any doubt that we are stronger than this storm,” he said. “God love you.”West of Panama City, services at Christ the King Episcopal Church in Santa Rosa Beach, Florida, were canceled Oct. 10 afternoon, but the congregation posted an update on Facebook the next day saying the church had weathered the storm well. “No damage to the buildings, no trees down and power is on,” the post said. “Prayers continue for those to the east of us.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest By David PaulsenPosted Oct 11, 2018 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK last_img read more

WWF uses compact raffle tickets

first_imgWWF uses compact raffle tickets Howard Lake | 14 October 2004 | News WWF-UK’s current raffle, the Autumn “Really Wild Raffle”, uses a very compact style of raffle ticket that uses far less paper than the traditional booklet.Supporters have received 20 raffle tickets in a recent mailing, but all tickets and reply stubs fit on one side of A4 paper. Raffle entrants can tear off the number of tickets they wish to buy or sell: the tickets all have perforated edges. The page is clearly designed so that the supporter knows which ticket to keep and which is the stub to return. Indeed, the two are coloured differently to make this even clearer.For those that want to sell tickets to others, the return stub has a name and address form on the reverse. Advertisement The tickets have been very well thought out. They are personalised for the supporter so that they do not need to fill in the address details on the reverse of any stubs they wish to buy.All in all, it is a very neat and practical solution to reducing paper in a fundraising campaign by an environmental body. Perhaps the only criticism is that, by fitting 20 tickets and 20 return stubs onto one A4 piece of paper, some of the text and address label space will be too small for some people to read or use.  35 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Tagged with: Gaming AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Bequests in wills made via Co-op Legal Services rise 61% in a year

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Melanie May | 20 May 2021 | News  599 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 “Legacy income has been vital for charities, particularly over the past year when events and retail were so badly hit, and that’s why continued reports of the public’s increased appetite for legacy giving is so welcome. People are looking for ways to express the things that matter most to them in life and it’s wonderful to see that legacies are so often felt to be such a rewarding way of giving. The legal sector plays a critical role in making clients aware of the option of giving in this way.” The number of wills made via Co-op Legal Services including a charitable bequest rose by 61% in 2020, with cancer charities (42%) and local causes (21%) most widely named as beneficiaries, it has revealed. Co-op Legal Services asks all its will-writing clients to consider the option of leaving a charitable bequest, and during the year, almost a third (32%) of Co-op wills included a gift to charity.  Bequests in wills made via Co-op Legal Services rise 61% in a year Tagged with: legacies legacy pledges Remember a Charitycenter_img Rob Cope, Director of Remember A Charity, of which Co-op Legal Services is a partner, commented: James Antoniou, Head of Wills at Co-op Legal Services, said: This year’s Remember A Charity Week takes place on 6-12 September. Additional figures from the Law Society show that while 59% of the UK public don’t have a will, 7% of people made or updated their will during the first lockdown and that one fifth of people with a will have included a charitable gift. Smee & Ford data shows that more than 100 people in the UK are now choosing to support their favourite causes this way every day. Advertisement “In an extraordinarily difficult year, when so many suffered hardship, it’s incredible to see such a huge increase in the number of people wanting to leave money to their chosen charity. Deciding who inherits your money or part of your estate is a highly personal matter and making people aware of their options is the key to ensuring that their wishes are clearly specified in their will.” About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Cancer Support Community Pasadena Announces New Executive Director

first_img Subscribe faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. 2 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it First Heatwave Expected Next Week Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News Cancer Support Community Pasadena Announces New Executive Director From STAFF REPORTS Published on Thursday, October 13, 2016 | 4:18 pm Meg SymesCancer Support Community Pasadena (“CSCP”) has announced the selection of Meg Symes as its new executive director. Symes will fill the vacancy created by Ben Green’s departure.Symes has served as CSCP’s Director of Major Gifts and Special Events for the organization since 2011.“We are excited to have Meg assume this leadership position. Meg is passionate about CSCP’s mission and works tirelessly on behalf of the organization. She is well known and well-loved in the community and is, quite frankly, ‘the face of CSCP’ in the community,” remarks Tom Daly, Board President.Symes is a life-long resident of Pasadena.She received her Bachelor of Arts, Social Sciences in 1983 from the University of California, Berkeley. Married to John Symes for 30 years, she and John are the proud parents of Katie (28), Sarah (26) and Jack (22). After being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009, she was asked to join CSCP’s Board of Directors and served from 2010 to 2011. So passionate about the organization, Meg resigned from the Board to accept a development position at CSCP in 2011.As Director of Major Gifts and Special Events, Meg has been instrumental in growing the organization’s base of supporters. Through CSCP’s annual events, including Angel Gala, Poker Bowl, Ladies Night Out and a Holiday Boutique/Luncheon (the latter two which she created), Meg has increased fundraising revenue to record levels. She also founded a volunteer Guild to assist with raising funds for CSCP, which has grown to 80+ volunteers. In addition to her events fundraising, Meg has been the lead contact with several area foundations who are active and generous supporters of CSCP, and she has also played a valuable role in board member recruitment for CSCP.“I am thrilled to continue to serve CSCP in this new capacity. I look forward to continuing to expand the organization’s reach and serve more men, women and children impacted by cancer, so that no one faces cancer alone,“ says Symes.Founded in 1990, Cancer Support Community Pasadena is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization providing free support, education and hope to individuals impacted by cancer. http://www.cscpasadena.org/ EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDScenter_img HerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyBet You Didn’t Need Another Reason To Stay Coupled Up This SeasonHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyFinding The Right Type Of Workout For You According AstrologyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeauty More Cool Stuff Make a comment Community News Business News Community News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Top of the News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more